Shaolin Buddhist Temple, Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland                                                           Email:

Sifu Nicholas Costello

 

Sifu Nicholas Costello, (Buddhist Name - Carma Walsa), started Kung Fu in 1973 and became a Sifu (Master) in 1982 with KC Tsang of London.  He went to Hong Kong to train with Grandmaster Chiu Chung/Si Gung.  He was adopted by Grandmaster Chiu Chung and was asked to carry on with the Dragon Sign Kung Fu/Lung Ying. In 1988, Sifu Costello brought a team to Ten Ging, Central China, to represent Ireland in Wu Shu Kung Fu exhibitions.

 

During his time in London he trained with JJ Wong, a famous Tai Chi Master. He also trained under a Wu Shu Tai Chi Master who came to Ireland for 1 year with the help of the Chinese Embassy. Sifu Costello was the first person to bring Tai Chi to Ireland in the late 70s. 

 

He was made President of The Irish Wu Shu Association, which is registered with The Wu Shu Association, Bejing, China and The International Wu Shu Organisation Headquaters, Paris.


He joined the Qigong Association in early 2000 and was invited to join the Tai Wu Qi Gong Association, North Point, Hong Kong under the leadership of Mr. Lao and Sifu Choi.  The Buddhist based Tai Wu Association being one of the largest Qigong associations in the whole of China.

 

The Lung Ying Association was awarded charitable in 2009 because of the work they do with different charities and healing.  Because the Lung Ying Kung Fu was originally a Buddhist principle, Buddhist teachings are practiced but not enforced.  This is also true of the Qigong.  If one wishes to carry these teachings any further they need but ask.

 

The Lung Ying Academy built the Shaolin Temple in Slane to Honour Chiu Chung, Grandmaster, who’s dying wish was to bring the original principles of the Dragon to the world in it’s original format which was and is Buddhist based.

 

The Kung Fu and Tai Chi are both taught in a very traditional sense.  They do not compete. Sifu Costello also teaches Dragon Dance and Lion Dance. 

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